While emojis are now commonplace in daily communication, they generally aren’t used in software intelligence platforms, and they don’t belong in our UI copy and most of our other messaging. There are three main reasons for this:

• Emojis distract from the content—words rather than emojis should be used to communicate your message.

• Emojis are used and interpreted differently depending on the culture and context in which they’re used—this can lead to inconsistency and confusion, making your message less effective.

• Emojis don’t fit with our platform personality—they can be used to express your personality but should not be used to express Dynatrace’s personality.

This guidance on emoji usage includes:

  1. An overview of our recommendations for emoji usage in different contexts.
  2. Ideas on what you can use instead of emojis.

Note:UI copy is any text that **can't **be edited by users, for example, tooltips, menu entries, or modal copy. Text that can be edited by users, for example, dashboard titles or notebook annotations, is “user-generated content” and is covered in that section.

Here's an overview of our recommendations for emoji usage per context:

Platform, App, and Solution UI copy

❌ Avoid using emojis

We recommend avoiding emojis in UI copy in the Platform, Apps, and Solutions. Our Platform Personality, Design Language, and Design System were carefully constructed to communicate the Dynatrace brand. Emojis can interfere with and distract from that communication. They also imply a too-casual tone that doesn’t fit with our Platform Personality and can be interpreted very differently by different audiences.

Documentation

❌ Avoid using emojis

Documentation needs a professional tone and technical precision that leaves as little as possible open for interpretation. It’s not the right place for emojis.

Website copy and blogs

❌ Avoid using emojis

As with Platform, App, and Solution UI copy, we recommend avoiding emojis in the marketing website copy and blogs. Again, emojis create a too-casual tone that doesn’t fit with our brand personality.

Internal communication (emails, presentations, messages, etc.)

Use your judgment

We don’t want to police emoji use in your internal presentations, emails, and other communication. And, of course, you’re free to use them to express your own personality rather than Dynatrace’s.

When it comes to emails, it’s worth remembering that the Dynatrace security policy requires that they should always be professional in nature.

Customer and other external emails

If the customer has used an emoji first

In your emails and messages to customers and partners, we recommend only using emojis if the customer or partner has used them first, or if you already know the customer and are confident that the context allows for a casual tone.

As with emoji usage in internal emails, the Dynatrace security policy requires that emails should always be professional in nature.

User-generated content (UGC)

✅ Don’t restrict emojis usage in UGC

We can't stop Dynatrace customers and partners from using emojis in their custom apps, documentation, or community content—and we wouldn't want to try. UGC must uphold community standards, but it is not part of our brand.

What you can use instead of emojis

Instead of using emojis, we recommend using words to convey the feeling or emotion you’re trying to express. At the same time as this—or as an alternative—you can use relevant icons to identify themes or add visual interest.

  1. Use words to convey the feeling or emotion you’re trying to express with the emoji

If you find yourself reaching for an emoji to make the copy feel warmer or more human, see if you can put it into words instead.

For example, if you wanted to use a 👏 emoji to praise or congratulate a user on completing a task, you could say “Nice work”, “Nicely done”, or “Great job” instead.

  1. Use relevant icons to identify themes or add visual interest

Although it’s not always immediately obvious, emojis differ from icons in three main ways:

We recommend using icons to identify themes and patterns and add visual interest. If you’re using emojis to create visual interest, think about how they could be replaced with icons instead.

It’s important to use icons consistently and according to their intended purpose, as our icons are a ‘visual language’ of their own. If you’d like to get more information about this topic, please reach out to Hartwig Salzer.

If you want to learn more about these guidelines or aren’t sure about using emojis, you can reach out to Jennifer Buley or John Cheung.